On air with Ray Bajada

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Radio: Once the sole hub of entertainment, is now considered passé by many. Locally, national radio stations tally up to some eleven stations, which for the most part, offer a wide range of music and entertainment shows. One radio station which has taken a different direction is the second radio station of the Public Broadcasting Services.

Ray Bajada

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Ray Bajada

Radju Malta 2, now better known as Radio 2, gives space for broadcasting enthusiasts on a national scale. In an interview, Radio 2’s coordinator Ray Bajada recounts the times when the PBS approached him to take the reins of a frequency which had been left withering, with tired automated playlists and broadcasts of parliamentary sittings:.

What is Radio 2’s purpose?

“Well, the demographic is always changing but, over the years it has been designated various roles, the latest being that of an ‘entertainment’ channel primarily transmitting a variety of DJ programs with a variety of music content while also keeping at the focus the role of educating through entertainment.”

Who is Ray Bajada?

“Haha! Possibly one of the last remaining radio presenters trained in the art and responsibilities of creating radio, by the likes of professionals such as Victor Aquilina, Charles Arrigo, and others… I’ve been at it since I was 17, on the then Redifussion, and now possess over 40 years of experience in this field.”

What is he doing at Radio 2?

“I’ve been called in by the national broadcaster to try and bring life to National Radio. First I was given the role of training young, aspiring broadcasters what National Radio consists of… something which as of late has been put aside in favour of on-air popularity. Nowadays, radio has changed and has moved onto the digital world, with specific content aimed particularly at a generation who is constantly online and on their phones. As such, I am trying, with the help of my team to formulate a plan that will effectively reach the up and coming, while retaining the discipline which was passed onto me when I was just starting in this field”

Ray Bajada during a studio session

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Ray Bajada during a studio session

Why this direction?

“Well, either evolve or die! FM radio has been diminishing in listenership. As has already been shown by institutions like the BBC, the only way radio will survive in the future is if it evolves to take on the challenges of new media. As shown by surveys, all indications point to the fact that the younger generations are growing less interested in this world of radio, unless content relevant for today’s needs is broadcasted.”

Where can people contact Radio 2?

“At present the best way to contact Radio 2 is via the Facebook page, ‘PBS Radio 2’. Any queries and/or suggestions sent through the page are immediately answered, and wherever possible, personally answered to the best of our ability.”

Could this be the way forward after video seems to have killed the radio star? As the world continues to move towards a better connected reality, perhaps it is finally time for a fresh start. Perhaps there is still hope for the young generation to rekindle the love once held by young enthusiasts of decades ago.

Written by

Jan Cauchi

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